Basic Facts on Small Business Loans

Basically, you need to a lot of resources to effectively manage your business. Your main purpose may start from a new idea for a business project or even an old product or service with a new method of introduction. Either way, you must realize that a business calls for a lot of requirements and necessities, most especially in the financial aspect.

Business loans are widely available which can range from government sponsored loans to private loans designed to assist new businesses. Actually there are many other options but it will depend on your preferences. If you want your interest rate to be low, then opt for loans coming from government grants.

If you do not want to venture in this type of loans, you can choose from those that are available in the open market. But these types of loans have a few conditions because these are provided by lenders. Typically, there are two types of loans; the secured and unsecured loans. For the initial process, you are required to come up with a well-drafted business plan or proposal along with your loan application form.

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SBA Small Business Loans and How They Can Be Used

Small Business Administration (SBA) business loans come in several sizes and forms. Of course, the SBA does not actually “loan” the money, they only “guarantee” loans made through banks and other financial institutions. However, depending on the size of your business and the stage your business development is in, one of the SBA business loan programs may work for you.

The first thing you need to determine is whether or not the SBA considers your business a “small business”. It is generally thought that the standard of 500 or fewer employees comprises a “small business.” However, that is not always the case. The SBA has definitions for small businesses that run from a maximum of 100 employees to 1,500 employees…and from a maximum of $0.75 million in annual revenue, to $27.0 million in annual revenue.

So, your first job is to determine if your business is really considered a “small business.” You can do this by contacting your local SBA District Office, or online at sba.gov.

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